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East Texas Rural Broadband Community Co-operative Program
 

WHITESPACE BROADBAND INTERNET DEFINED
   Just what is White Space? This coming June all over-the-air television stations are required to switch off their ANALOG transmission and go to all digital programming. The transmission frequency required to transmit digital information (1's and 0"s) is much smaller than that needed for analog transmission. The ANALOG space left over when each channel goes digital is called White Space and is managed under rules determined by the FCC
  
   The left over analog channel space has been set up by the FCC for use as unlicensed frequencies which means it can be freely used by the public. Because of the possibility of interference with broadcast digital signals, the FCC has attached rules for the use of the unlicensed frequency space. Vendors who create products capable of using this free space must meet strict requirements as they develop their products.

   The advantage of white space frequency is its ability to penetrate obstacles such as walls. Because the internet is a two way communication medium, the further away a transmit - receive combination, the more power it take to communicate. The shorter the distance, less power is needed. In the white space world, less power mean less equipment, and less equipment means lower setup cost.

  

RURAL CO-OPERATIVE PROPOSAL
   High speed internet is easily accessible for those who live in close proximity to most cities with larger populations. Rural access opportunities drop off greatly once the boundaries of a town's services is exceeded. Fortunately there are internet access options available to most Americans, unfortunately they are expensive and beyond the budgets of most rural households.

   By developing Community Co-ops, households within the range of a White Space transmitter (about 5 miles) can organize to develop their own broadband network. The initial setup is a little more complicated then described and does require trained technicians to set up the and manage the network. Current hardware products that distribute broadband signal are relatively durable and do not require constant maintenance to operate properly.

With White Space broadband, the equipment needed to setup a transmitter is more affordable because of the ability to penetrate objects reduces the need for tall towers for the transmitter. The costs of less for customers because less equipment is need to communicate back to the transmitter. The biggest expense is a high speed connection to the transmitter, such as a T1 or T3 connection.

The purpose of the Rural Broadband Co-Operative Company is to assist communities in teaming up to develop their own broadband networks then sharing the cost with their neighbors.
Source: About.com

 As the FCC struggles to discover and allocate more spectrum for broadband use, the Commission, in a unanimous vote, approved the use of “white space” for broadband. What is “white space,” and what does it have to do with broadband? White spaces are unused bands of spectrum between television stations, left after television signals went digital.

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Source: Roanoke.com

 When television made its grand switch to digital, a spectrum of space was freed. Nearly a year ago, officials and technology experts in the small Patrick County community of Claudville were granted an experimental license from the Federal Communications Commission to determine if those unused frequencies could be used to bounce wireless signals to some of the most isolated parts of Virginia. The project was successful.

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Source: Rice University

 Rice University researchers have won a $1.8 million federal grant for one of the nation's first, real-world tests of wireless communications technology that uses a broad spectral range -- including dormant broadcast television channels -- to deliver free, high-speed broadband Internet service. The five-year project calls for Rice and Houston nonprofit Technology For All (TFA) to add "white space" technology to the wide spectrum Wi-Fi network they jointly operate in Houston's working-class East End neighborhood.

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Source: www.howstuffworks.com

 The key word here is unlicensed Internet providers. If this technology reaches its full potential, anyone would be able to set up a white space hotspot like anyone can set up a wifi hot spot today. If that can happen and the range is respectable, it would provide real competition to both cable companies and cell phone providers. This could have a huge effect on the price and availability of both services.

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Source: Spectrum Bridge

 Spectrum Bridge, Inc. in partnership with Plumas-Sierra Rural Electric Cooperative  and Google, Inc. has launched the nation’s first “Smart Grid” wireless network trial, utilizing TV White Spaces Spectrum. SBI’s solution is able to access available TV White Spaces spectrum and manage the deployed “Smart Grid” network by dynamically assigning non-interfering frequencies to White Spaces devices throughout the service area to effectively provide bandwidth where and when it’s needed.

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Source: Radiomagonline.com

 Sep 24, 2010 - Rice University professors Edward Knightly and Lin Zhong are likely to be among the first in the nation to test the FCC's new white-spaces rules, thanks to a recent $1.8 million federal grant to establish a white-space test-bed network in East Houston.

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Source: Dailywireless.org

 A small rural community is taking matters in to their own hands to solve their lack of broadband. They’re using “white space” radios from Carlson Wireless, combined with lightly-licensed 3.65 WiMax and cellular microcells, writes Kim Miyade.

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Source: Digital Society

 First I need to correct an assertion I made last week in a blog.  I always hate having to admit to a mistake, but the one thing I hate more is someone not owning up to a mistake when the evidence is clear.  I spend a lot of time analyzing (and debunking if necessary) the work of others and it frustrates me to no end if they ignore the evidence so I would be a hypocrite if I behaved in the same manner.

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Source: Cnet.com News

 The city of Wilmington, N.C., and the surrounding county of New Hanover, N.C., are among the first communities to test wireless applications using TV white space technology. The city and county have partnered with TV Band Service and Spectrum Bridge to launch a new experimental network that uses white space spectrum to provide wireless connectivity to surveillance cameras and environmental sensors in a "smart city" deployment.

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Source: www.readwriteweb.com

 If you're one of those people (like myself) that hasn't had cable television in a while, then you remember when everything went digital last summer and rabbit ears became a thing of the past, like rotary phones and modems. The changeover was all part of a larger plan, and part of that plan was to free up some of the broadcasting spectrum for other uses

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Source: Technology Review

 A person living in upstate Michigan may gain significantly more from the death of analog television than someone living in New York City--at least, as far as long-range wireless Internet is concerned, a study suggests. On November 4, 2008, the Federal Communications Commission voted to allow the "white spaces" in the radio spectrum that were freed up by the analog television switch-off to be used for long-distance wireless Internet connectivity.

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Source: Technology Review

 The first "white spaces" devices, which thread long-range wireless data signals through gaps in TV spectrum, will start to appear later this year.  Microsoft is bidding to play a central role in how they operate. The coming devices are expected to include home routers to bring Internet to the home and even mobile devices such as phones or tablets.

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Source: Technology Review

 Since rural America has fewer local TV stations, it will have far more of these empty "white spaces" to fill with new wireless signals, points out Alex Besen, who runs an industry consultancy, the Besen Group. In many rural areas, super Wi-Fi will have access to well over 200 megahertz of spectrum, he estimates—more capacity than Verizon and AT&T combined.

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White spaces (radio) - Wikipedia
In telecommunications, white spaces refer to frequencies allocated to a broadcasting service but not used locally. In the United States, it has gained prominence after the FCC ruled that unlicensed devices that can guarantee that they will not interfere with assigned broadcasts can use the empty white spaces in spectrum.
 
The White Spaces Coalition's plans for fast wireless broadband
The White Spaces Coalition (WSC) is a group of companies devoted to making use of white space in the analog television spectrum to offer wireless broadband. It's an impressive lineup: Microsoft, Google, Dell, HP, Intel, Philips, Earthlink, and Samsung are the group's public members; there are also a couple of Coalition members who prefer to remain unknown.
 
And now a moment of…whitespace
The concept derives from the broadband spectrum used for broadcast television and the cable network. Now as you may have heard, the cable companies are trying to push to a completely digital environment and out of the old analog television spectrum.
 
How to Get a Wireless NISP Built in Your Neighborhood
What is the best way to get a broadband wireless network built in your neighborhood, if you personally cannot afford it.
 
White space — our wireless broadband future?
 The unoccupied radio spectrum between broadcast TV channels may soon become a source of low-cost, ubiquitous broadband connectivity. Earlier this month, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission began Phase II testing of prototype “white space devices” (WSDs), to determine whether they can operate without interfering with the wireless devices commonly used in homes, offices, and public locations.
 
TV White Space Position Paper - Motorola
Fixed TV White Space Solutions for Wireless ISP Network Operators
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has decided to open spectrum traditionally allocated to broadcast TV to provide broadband access for Americans, especially those in rural areas in the United States. Solutions that use this newly opened spectrum must not interfere with existing users and services in this spectrum.
 
Universal TV White Space Broadband? US Broadband Penetration Grows to 92.1% among Active Internet Users
With the move to digital television, the question becomes what to do with all of those unused analog TV channels? Despite opposition by the entrenched broadcast television media, many have lobbied to release this unused spectrum to the public to create a widespread, low-cost wireless network.
 
Whitespace Broadband - a primer
With digital TV crawling slowly towards reality, broadband advocates and companies are eyeing the freed spectrum to launch Internet services over the freed spectrum, so it's worth understanding the potential applications and limitations of the so-called “whitespace” spectrum.
 
 
 
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